Why I became an Agent

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Why I became an Agent

Bing Bangboom
  We know why James 315 started miner bumping.  We also know why Gevlon started ganking miners.  What about the rest of us?  Unlike most Knights, we Agents had histories in Eve prior to the New Order.  Here is mine.  I invite the other Agents to add their stories, either in this thread or their own.  This is long, read at your own risk.

  Like many players, Bing Bangboom is not my first character.  However, in some ways he is in that he has carried the main idea of what I want to do in Eve from my first days to today.

  My first created toon, who shall remain nameless because of where he currently resides, was created on April 2, 2011.  Bing Bangboom quickly followed on April 4, 2011.  He was created by my 13 year old son so he could try out the new game I was just starting.  Thus the name and the way Bing looks.  Like many teenagers, he quickly lost interest and went back to his xBox.  But not before making Bing into a.... well, a miner.

  After running the tutorials and running missions with my own toon for a few weeks, I discovered, via the Eve forums, the career of ninja salvager.  I quickly found this to be much more satisfying to my entertainment AND financial needs.  I soon discovered that there was really good ISK to be made from taking what was IN the cans as well as salvaging the wrecks.  I moved from flitting around a room behind the mission runners to boldly taking right in front of them to eventually, ransoming the mission objectives.  And I admit it, the rage and tears of the mission runners were liquid gold to me.

  Meanwhile, Bing languished until I heard of an organization called Red vs Blue.  Bing joined RvB and I began training to be a Rifter pilot.  I was a very bad Rifter pilot.  But I got a few kills and discovered the Battleclinic killboard.  RANKINGS!  I was the 243,364nd best pvp pilot in the game!  And so I researched (Wesleys Rifter Drifter ftw) and trained.

  Now, I'm always thinking and I'm thinking my ninja salvager would be cooler if he could kill the mission runners.  Well, those guys fly BIG ships in lvl 4s so I had to work my way up.  More research.  Answer: can flipping miners.  Now remember, this isn't Bing.  I head out in my Rifter, fly from belt to belt, and find an Osprey with a can out.  I flip it.  The team mate of his in a Drake warps in and smashes me into little Minmatar pieces.  Learning experience.  But I persist and try again.  This time the miner leaves, comes back in a Badger, AND TAKES THE ORE BACK!  And so my addiction began.

  Everything else in EvE is forgotten.  I spend my days and nights flying from system to system, belt to belt, looking for cans.  I learn to Dscan to avoid having to fly into each belt, I learn to set contact standings to watch for corpmates of my targets in local, I learn where cans can be anchored and where they cannot.  I learn to tell what guns a ship has, which pvp ships are dangerous and which are easy. But most of all, I learn how to actually talk the miners into fighting back, or barring that, taking back their ore.  As my skills climb, the kill becomes easy. The social engineering becomes the challenge and the fun.  I create the DAMAG Safety Commission where I berate the miners for unsafe cans floating in the space lanes creating a hazard to navigation.  I issue them citations.  I receive a massive deluge of complaints, "official warnings" from corporations, alliances and even CCP once (that rookie system thing), and even a few students who I teach my methods.

  And then it happened.  My corp, who tolerated and even enjoyed hearing about my exploits, changed alliances.  They joined a famously anti-pirate alliance... in Providence... yeah, those guys.  Well, nobody told me.  Soooo, my second day in our new alliance I rain justice down upon a Retriever, post it on my new alliance's killboard and alliance chat explodes.  And my career as a can flipper ended at 109-25 almost breaking through top 5000 on Battleclinic.  Every kill was with the Rifter.  Mining ships, Badgers (lots of Badgers), frigates, destroyers, cruisers and even a couple battlecruisers... all 1v1, all with the Rifter.

  Cold turkey.  The effect was crushing.  Depression set in.  What to do?  Bing was the answer.

  I resumed my career as a can flipper shortly there after.  A little setback as Bing, while a heck of an industrialist, was missing a lot of the skills of Nor.. oops, him who shall be nameless.  After a few setbacks where I wrote checks that Bing couldn't cash I was back in the groove.  DAMAG Safety Commission resumed.  The CEO of Bing's corp began receiving angry emails.  I was flying high again.  For several months, I patrolled my circuit of Caldari space, a lonely vigilante protecting the safety of space lane navigation.  All who crossed my path remembered it.  I flipped lone miners, I flipped corporation mining ops, I flipped can flippers.  I got up to 258-52.  I killed a Caracal and a Raven in the same fight.  I ran from no one.  And all still in my trusty Rifter.  I was ranked in the top 2500 on Battleclinic because the ranking system is so screwed up that solo kills in a Frigate count as much as killing dozens of opponents in fleet fights.

  If you've read this far you are probably thinking... becoming an Agent... where's that part?  Well, here it is.

  My can flipping days ended, slowly and mind numbingly boringly, with the Exhumer ore hold buff.  The cans basically disappeared.  The only cans out were the week old new players and I quickly decided that was not what I was doing it for.  And like anyone who had something important taken away from them, I was angry.  After patrolling the belts for a few weeks I decided that it was over.  The upcoming Crimewatch II was the candle on top.  Can flipping was dead.  Everyone else seemed to know it before me.  I may have been the last to figure it out.  Just like the Gankers my preferred game style was nerfed.  Unlike them, mine was exterminated.  

  I had to find something else.  And then I heard about www.minerbumping.com.  I had heard of James 315 before and read his very long Eve forum posts.  But now it all was real to me.  What he said would happen, HAD happened to me.  Highsec had been made safe... from me.  And so, I bumped.

  And I haven't looked back.

Highsec is worth fighting for.

Bing Bangboom
Agent of the New Order of Highsec
Belligerent Undesirable
Highsec is worth fighting for.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Agent Eunoli
My tale of becoming an Agent is a simple one at its core.

I’ve been playing EVE Online for a few years.  During this time I have had active periods and dormant periods much like many long term EVE players.  I’ve tried many different aspects of EVE from highsec to null sec and enjoyed almost all of it.

I ran into a thread on the EVE Online forums about bumping miners.  I was intrigued.  I had no idea who this James 315 character was nor did I understand the remarkable emotional response that many of the posters had about him and bumping.  I wanted to know more.

I began reading the blog.  I was amused by the whole thing.  I thought James 315 had a fine idea and I was impressed with what he was trying to pull off.  But, that was that.  Miner Bumping was a fun read and I checked in on it periodically to see what was going on.  

One day, during a quiet period, I decided to fly an alt out to where the New Order of Highsec was operating.  I wanted to see, first hand, if what the blog was saying was true.  Were miners really getting that upset over being bumped?  Did people really explode in a completely disproportionate way over ten million ISK?  Could some EVE players really be so petty and ridiculous?  Was it possible that some people would rather get blown up than toss out 10 million ISK?

I was in luck!  When I got to the system that the New Order was operating in there was a local who was just raging about the New Order.  I couldn’t believe what I was reading.  It simply made no sense what so ever.  And then, just as I was about to write it off as a single outlier another in local joined in.  I couldn’t resist.  I wrote something along the lines that I thought that the New Order had every right to do what they were trying to do within the framework and context of EVE Online.  Emergent gameplay and all of that.

Oh boy.  That was a game changer for me.  Suddenly –I- was being accused of all kinds of stuff.  It was so over the top and outrageous that I started to laugh out loud.  So, I might have fed the anger a little.  While I was doing this an Agent of the New Order took me into a private conversation and asked me what I thought about the New Order.  Well, I didn’t know what to write.  I didn’t even know who they were.  Was this some weird kind of trap?

I decided that it didn’t matter and I made a relatively non-committal comment that the New Order was okay by me (after all, in local I had already said much the same thing) and they invited me to super-secret-New-Order-EVE-channel.    I guess that made me an Agent.

For awhile I was only active in local.  I didn’t do anything else other than try to have a logical discussion with the clearly illogical and emotionally vigorous individuals against the New Order.  Well, that led to me trying my hand at bumping in a noob ship.  It takes a very long time to bump an exhumer class ship out of mining range in a noob ship with no afterburner.  But, I persevered and I achieved success time and time again which also proved one thing to me:  so many of these miners were very much AFK and oblivious.  

Because of them, I purchased a new account and paid for it.  I created Agent Eunoli and trained up to an invincible Stabber Fleet Issue (that has already survived one suicide gank attack).  Once that was trained up I started training up Knight Eunoli to assist in the effort of confiscating ships and pods of those who violate the Code.

The Code is, in my opinion, everything that EVE Online is about.  This is player made content for the purpose of engaging other players.  People can choose to be “against” the New Order (you would be surprised at how many of these “rebels” are really in the New Order and just making some ISK on the side) and that is great.  Why?  It means that the New Order has breathed new life into their gaming experience.  The New Order has provided them with a reason to play and to interact.

I am proud to be an Agent of the New Order of Highsec.  I am proud to be part of a group of outstanding individuals who strive to interact and create content for other players in Highsec.  I am proud to be part of the crusade against bots  and to get people to wake up while playing.  The New Order of Highsec is an awesome organization to be a part of and I am grateful to James 315 for having the courage, audacity, and perseverance to make it happen.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Melody Amatin
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Bing Bangboom
Oo, story time!

I started playing EVE in the spring of 2004 with a group of 3 friends. We had heard that the exciting bits of EVE were the PvP and intrigue and emergent gameplay, but of course, you needed ISK. Or at least, we thought you did.

So we started out mining in hisec because, well, honestly because that's about the only option you had back then. I would park my Badger in an asteroid field and set my mining laser on a rock and then leave for work. I would run home at lunch to switch it to a different rock so I could double; DOUBLE!; my daily AFK yield.

We would joke and laugh about how stupid this all was and how, just as soon as we had a bit more ISK in our wallets, we'd put together some PvP ships and go roam losec and nullsec the way the game was "meant" to be played.

You kids these days are spoiled by the ISK that gets thrown at you. In those early days, no, it wasn't like that. I remember being so excited when I hit my first million that I took a screenshot of my wallet. Getting the CSPA corp registration fee together was a major achievement for our 4 person group. And, I remember my first cruiser.

My first cruiser was an Osprey, and I didn't put guns on it or go roam losec. I bought it because I could mine with it while my friend hauled stuff back to the station in his Badger. Oh, don't get me wrong, there was nothing "bad" about this. At least we were ATK and interacting with each other but still, somehow, subtly and without us noticing it, we had started to forget about our dreams of doing something exciting in EVE and started caring more about watching our wallets grow.

It didn't go completely unremarked. On many occasions we noted how "just another million ISK" and we'd feel comfortable taking risks. We knew that's why we were supposed to be playing, but when that next million rolled in it just never felt like it was enough. We had become slaves to the ISK.

The months rolled by and we finally got to the point where we were going to be able to afford battleships. Now remember, this is back in 2004 when getting into a battleship was basically end-game. That was it; you were complete as a pilot if you could fly one of those amazing and expensive ships. At this point we had a moment of clarity; the fog of addiction lifted briefly. We put our foots down and made a pact.

We would not, under any circumstances, mine in our battleships. This is what we promised ourselves.

This respite from the ISK addiction lasted only a few days. My friend was the first to be able to afford his shiny new BS; an Armageddon. It was a wondrous, beautiful machine of awesome killing potential. And it took him about twenty seconds to put mining lasers on it and join us in the asteroid belt.

We had reached the end-game, and the end-game was us mining AFK in battleships.

Then, one day, the most incredible thing happened. I swear to god this is a true story. Not a word of it is falsehood (including the fact that it really did happen to my friend, and not me, no matter how cliche that may sound).

My friend was mining in his mighty Armageddon -- an awesome asteroid killing machine -- in a 0.5 or 0.6 system. And the rats respawned, and for whatever reason he was alone and defenseless. So, naturally, he tried to warp away to the next belt to continue on with his asteroid genocide, but something odd happened.

His ship got stuck trying to enter warp on the very asteroid he had just been laying to waste. Now, as we had spent most of our EVE career mining more or less AFK in hisec, there were certain mechanics we didn't know about. For instance, CTRL-space to stop your warp so you could regain control of your ship for navigational purposes was one of the things we had not yet learned (and I'm fairly certain that at this point in the game's history the right-click "Stop Ship" option did not exist either, but I could be wrong).

As a result, my friend had no clue how to stop his ship from trying to warp. And his ship, apparently, had no clue how to get around the asteroid in its way so it COULD warp. Over an agonizingly painful thirty-odd minutes, my friend was forced to watch while the belt rats chipped away at his precious golden battleminer while his navigational computer tried desperately to work its way around that vengeful rock. And finally, it was done. His abomination of a battleship was blown apart by a half dozen frigate rats.

Now, I don't believe asteroids are alive, but I do believe that particular asteroid was laughing.

To this very day I have no idea why my friend did not simply log off, ctrl-f4 his game, or get on the phone and call me to log in and bring a ratting cruiser to save his ass. It wasn't like he didn't have time. I suspect that facing the reality that he was at risk of losing his expensive ship was so overwhelming that it shut down all higher brain functions. This is how bad our ISK addiction and risk-aversion had become, and having watched the confused and irrational rage of our targets in local, I'm inclined to believe it's a common response. Or, perhaps, some small part of his brain knew this was really all for the best and prevented rational decisions to ensure it would play out as fate had intended.

Regardless, this preposterous event reshaped our view of EVE completely. It was the shock we needed to break our ISK addiction for good. That very day we put guns on cruisers and went into losec for the first time ever. Then we got blown up, so we put guns on frigates and went right back in.

Oh sure, we still mined. We still needed the ISK, after all. But now it was a means to an end, rather than the end itself. And after that day, we mostly mined by sneaking cruisers into nullsec where the riches were rumored to exist. As it turned out we weren't very good at PvP, or nullsec mining operations, or just about anything. But damn if we weren't finally, for the first time, actually playing EVE.

So why did I join the New Order? Because I'm the asteroid this time, and I'm the one laughing.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Melissa Cesaille
 I started playing EVE in 2010. A couple of my friends described the sheer scope of what you could do in the game and I decided I wanted to make a career of space priesting; flying logistics ships and being a hero in spectacular small gang battles.

 As I trained for these ships, I started running missions. Eventually, that was all I did; I was too afraid of being part of something and letting people down to join a corp, let alone move to nullsec where all the action apparently was. My friends didn't stay in high sec long, one became a pirate and had fantastic tales of battles; another joined a wormhole corp and was making more ISK than I could hope to earn in a day of grinding. All I had was an efficient mission running process; I could AFK in a domi and the game would play itself!

 Pitiful.

 Incursions arrived, and brought people like me a gateway into fleet warfare. Suddenly those languishing logi skills were in high demand. I was making as much as a wormhole pilot and there was an frantic air of competition about the whole thing. I trained for other logi ships, eventually an orca so I could haul them from incursion to incursion.

 Then, carebears took over the process. No longer was it a race to bring down a mothership. We had to farm the incursions, maximise the money made, and take any sense of risk or fun out of it. I'd finally started to enjoy the game and they took that away from me.

 I'd been training a miner, Dana, so I had something less... intensive to do while looking for fleets, something reminiscent of my AFK missioning past. After a bit of a dormant spell, I tried running incursions again but had lost interest in it. Then I read The Blog. With tales of people trying to drag others kicking and screaming out of that mechanized playstyle, I had to get involved. I flew my miner to Kamio, waited for the agents to show up, and joined the moment someone asked.

 I made this ganking alt out of a wardeccing toon (good for irritating incursion runners). Now my other characters are involved in wormholes, and I'd need a damn good reason to be dragged into another mission.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Manny Moons
In reply to this post by Bing Bangboom
I don't have an interesting story. I'm just an Eve noob - my oldest toon is only a few months old. But being a Knight has been so much fun, I'm thinking of having my main become an Agent.

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Re: Why I became an Agent

Titus Phook
I started just after Apocrypha and I was quickly recruited by a hisec missioning corp, bear in mind that Eve is my first and only MMO, the whole social thing was a breath of fresh air, and then came the wardec. The CEO advised everybody to dock up, I chatted to a few like minded friends and decided that we wanted to do more than dock up, we moved to losec to see if the aggressors would follow. We ended up in a 0.2 system and began to rat the belts as a team, none of us had more than 6-8 weeks in the game at this stage. We got ganked by the local pirates and got chatting to them. We came to an agreement, they rented us ratting rights at a huge disocount because A. we were noobs and B. they smelled the chance of some fun. Needless to say the corp that wardecced us lost a few ships to the locals when they turned up looking for us.

6 months, I'm in a wormhole corp, only 5 of us but good fun, got some kills, got killed, made gobloads of money, slowly the corp drifted it was down to 2 of us (I am the POS fairy) one of whom only logged once a week. We disbanded, and moved back to hisec joining a large corp doing mainly PvE but running the occasional war to. My old CEO left the game, feeling despondent as we were good friends by then, I settled into the daily grind of increasing my wallet & net worth, doing just enough to pay for PLEX and the occasional new ship, boredom sets in, I start trolling the forums.

And then BAM!! James' Manefesto hits me in the face, settled in as a carebear I argue the carebear case in a sensible manner. As time goes by my boredom increases, I play less, I look to the threadnaughts, I start reading the Mittani.com, Minerbumping becomes a thing and here I am. Being involved in this has revitalised my game, I spend more time in Eve now than I have in long time, I still mission run for plex, I've started market trading, I've made some investments in BPOs, I've got an industrial chain going AND I get to shoot people in the face when I feel like it, with people who seem to know what they're doing.

TL;DR I'd gotten bored, thanks to the people here my game is saved, I've made new friends, I've diversified and above all Eve is FUN
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Capt Lynch
In reply to this post by Bing Bangboom
This isn't a story of why I became an agent...this is more why I am considering it...as a ex-victim of you guys.

I have to say...Awoxing interests me...not only for the fun...but for the potential profit should your victim give you hanger and wallet access.

Even better...your actions are going to make it very easy for me to plant myself as a New Order mole in the mining corp of Mr 315's choice...and the officer of the watch will be there to help his fellow knights shoot him.

And if I get bored in the mining corp, I can crash a mining fleet and blast them all to bits.

On that note...I think I will remain quiet on who my primary character is...at least for now.

Happy hunting

-Officer of the watch.

An alt character.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Aleksa Mayhap
In reply to this post by Bing Bangboom
I signed up my main for EVE just after the Incarna expansion, blissfully unaware of the Summer of Rage and mightily impressed with the character creator. It was a friend who drew me in. "Train up and grind missions!" he said, "Once you can run level 4's we'll run together. It'll be awesome."

So I ran missions. And more missions. And more missions. And after a while I had scraped together my first million ISK in Level 1 bounties and rewards. Ouch. I came to Level 2 and found myself aghast at the thought of having to grind through two more levels before I could join my friend and roll around in piles of ISK and merriment.

I punched up Google and looked for "AFK mission running." Then the insanity of it struck me. I was looking for a way to play EVE without playing EVE. And I was paying money for this privilege. Oy vey. That was it. EVE was obviously a terrible game with nothing but boredom to offer.

But one of the Google hits had come up with something called "ninja salvaging." I clicked it. Life has never been the same since. Suddenly I was not only interacting with people, I was the one bringing interaction to people - sometimes to their delight, often to their shock and horror. I was having a blast!

When the New Order rose to prominence I recognized a kindred spirit and bought 100 shares. When the Knights opened their doors, I dusted off an alt and enrolled her into the Order. This is EVE, baby.
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Re: Why I became an Agent

Galaxy_Pig
In reply to this post by Bing Bangboom
It didn't even take me the duration of my trial account to determine that mining and industry are boring. Since then I've set about the task of waging war on the carebears, because I truly believe it has to be done. I also lived in null as a pet of whitenoise, tried out factional warfare, and lived in a wormhole, but always returned to Highsec to ensure the carebears have someone to kill them. Right around the exhumer buff I first encountered the writings of James 315 in an article on themittaniDotcom concerning the bleak future a safe highsec would bring. I was initially struck by the fact that people were even considering such a thing. Little did I know other kinds of MMO players were trying to shave the edge off of my game. I had never played any other MMO, I knew about the strange attitudes of the many carebears I had encountered, who didnt seem to understand how things work in EVE, but I was oblivious to the front they had taken against the core concepts of EVE, and the ground they had gained. His other articles lead to this blog, lead to hours of entertainment and a growing sympathy to his cause. Finally! Here was something I dreamed of as a noob! Claiming sovereingty in Highsec?!? Could it be?!? Taxing the lifeless carebears, and banning the bots ourselves! A noble cause if ever there was one. So I would forego my jihad against ALL carebears, and restrain myself to only killing those who violate the code.
Galaxy Pig's sec status was too low, so I decided to get my trader alt, prophetically named Kho'd, into a stabber and join them in Kamio. I regularly bumped during off-hours, quietly enforcing the code while the other agents slumbered. Meanwhile, I took up the cause as a New Order forum-warrior, and managed to coerce CCP Falcon into officially addressing the issue. I was one of what I'm sure were many supporters encouraging the Savior of Highsec to step up his game, and found his righteous army. Once he finally did, I was overjoyed, and enlisted immediately. The rest is history, but we're still writing it, so get back to me.